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Fleur Mainville's family accepts Music Nova Scotia award on her behalf

Andrew, Ava and Dominic Heighton, along with Jocelyne Mainville are shown with the Music Nova Scotia Award of Excellence, given to Fleur Mainville posthumously on Friday during the opening reception of Nova Scotia Music Week.
Andrew, Ava and Dominic Heighton, along with Jocelyne Mainville are shown with the Music Nova Scotia Award of Excellence, given to Fleur Mainville posthumously on Friday during the opening reception of Nova Scotia Music Week.

TRURO, N.S. - Fleur Mainville’s contribution to the music industry was recognized at the Nova Scotia Music Week opening reception Friday night in Truro.

Mainville was given the Award of Excellence posthumously, which was accepted by her family. 

Andrew Heighton, her husband, said accepting the award on her behalf was an honour. 

“Aside from entertaining and helping students, she always wanted to win an award through Music Nova Scotia. It’s great that was able to come to fruition tonight,” he said. “I think she’d want to thank Music Nova Scotia, Pictou County and all her students that have helped her get here.” 

The award was established in 2010 and has only been handed out once previously; it is given to members of Music Nova Scotia who have contributed generously and extraordinarily to the province’s music industry.  

Mainville died on Jan. 21, 2015 of cancer at 37 years old.

Loved throughout Pictou County and the province, she was known for her many roles in the community – talented musician, teacher of hundreds of students, radio personality, market manager, and volunteer, to name a few.

Music Nova Scotia Executive Director Scott Long said in a release that Mainville served as a promotor of the music of Nova Scotia and instilled a great sense of cultural pride in youth whom she taught.

“Fleur was a talented musician and, more importantly, an exceptional person.”  

Mainville was given the Award of Excellence posthumously, which was accepted by her family. 

Andrew Heighton, her husband, said accepting the award on her behalf was an honour. 

“Aside from entertaining and helping students, she always wanted to win an award through Music Nova Scotia. It’s great that was able to come to fruition tonight,” he said. “I think she’d want to thank Music Nova Scotia, Pictou County and all her students that have helped her get here.” 

The award was established in 2010 and has only been handed out once previously; it is given to members of Music Nova Scotia who have contributed generously and extraordinarily to the province’s music industry.  

Mainville died on Jan. 21, 2015 of cancer at 37 years old.

Loved throughout Pictou County and the province, she was known for her many roles in the community – talented musician, teacher of hundreds of students, radio personality, market manager, and volunteer, to name a few.

Music Nova Scotia Executive Director Scott Long said in a release that Mainville served as a promotor of the music of Nova Scotia and instilled a great sense of cultural pride in youth whom she taught.

“Fleur was a talented musician and, more importantly, an exceptional person.”  

Amelia Parker and Hannah Fraser, who were both taught by Fleur Mainville, performed during the opening reception.

Heighton, her children Dominic and Ava, and her mother Jocelyne accepted the award, while two students, Amelia Parker and Hannah Fraser, of Mainville’s played fiddle tunes to wrap up the tribute. Music Nova Scotia President Brian Doherty spoke about Mainville’s teaching, her volunteerism, storytelling, and her musical career.

“It was touching. Fleur deserved it. She lived for music. Not just music, but life. We still miss her very much,” said Jocelyne Mainville.

Jocelyne said she notices similarities between students like Parker and Fleur – with playing and volunteering out in the community. 

“I’m sure Fleur is very very proud of her,” she said, noting Fleur would always joke with Parker when she arrived for a lesson. 

Parker, who is 11 years old, said it was nice to take part in the reception and to have been asked. 

Parker said Fleur, who taught her for three years, was nice and funny as a teacher. 

“She was very good at teaching and she would … get you out to perform places.”

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