Top News

Local actors featured in The Only Game in Town 


By Carol Dunn THE NEWS TATAMAGOUCHE – When Jessie Craig was a young girl, she loved to perform. “I was always putting on shows and making stupid little videos in the basement that will probably haunt me when I’m older,” she said.

Now 19 years old, Craig wants to turn her passion for performing into a career and she’s hoping that her role as Odette in The Only Game in Town will help her achieve that goal.

“I’m really hoping this is what’s going to be my career for the rest of my life. Honestly, right now I’m living my dream.”

Craig is from Seafoam, and is one of several Pictou County actors who have major roles in the feature film that’s produced by Simple Films and being shot in Tatamagouche.

The comedy centres on Cormack Vertue, played by Jesse Hemmings of Merigomish. Cormack has Asperger’s Syndrome, is a whiz at the game Solitaire and is in love with Odette.

Hemmings is also hoping the film will jumpstart a career in acting. “I’m hoping it leads somewhere,” he said. “I really like being able to step out of myself and being something else.”

 

For Aldo Orsi and Josh Fifield, involvement in the film has allowed them to get a look at what happens behind the camera.

“For me I like to be able to see all the behind the scenes and it’s been really awesome to see what everyone does, asking questions. It’s really cool,” said Fifield.

He’s acted in high school stage productions several times, and notes the differences between the two mediums.

“With my previous theatre experience – you have to memorize the whole thing, so scene by scene is easier, and you get multiple takes.”

Orsi, who has had roles in plays at Northumberland Regional High School, said: “When you’re on stage, you can’t do it again.”

Continuity is also something new for them, but extremely important. Because the scenes weren’t shot in order, the actors are responsible for keeping track of their outfits day by day.

“We get to pick our outfits but we have to make sure the continuity is right. We have to remember what we wore on that day,” said Fifield.

He plans to study screen arts at NSCC in the fall, and said getting to be part of the film so close to home is great. “I plan on furthering my career in this and I feel it’s a great stepping stone. So far I love the experience.”

Filming for The Only Game in Town is expected to wrap up Thursday, after 14 days in Tatamagouche, with total filming time of about 20 days. This includes work at several other locations – River John, Scotsburn, Onslow, Malagash, and the Pictou County Wellness Centre back in May.

The feature film is being shot in a condensed time frame because of several factors, said Stuart Cresswell of Simple Films -- a film, TV and DVD production company with offices in River John.

“Due to the cost of hiring the equipment and accommodations – the longer it takes, the more expensive it is – it all adds up,” he said. “We saw a narrow window of opportunity to make the film.”

Another key consideration was the availability of the cast members, and the fact that they didn’t want to film on weekends during the school year. “You don’t get continuity on weekends,” he said.

Cresswell is the feature film’s scriptwriter, producer and director. He took on the role of director when Cory Bowles of Truro (Trailer Park Boys) wasn’t able to do the job because of scheduling conflicts that occurred after the project was delayed due to uncertainties surrounding the Nova Scotia Film Tax Credit.

Cresswell moved from England to River John in 2006, and chose to film in Tatamagouche because the area is both beautiful and welcoming.  

“The scenery up here is stunning,” he said, adding that the community is extremely supportive. “You face all sorts of challenges when making a film, and to have the community on your side, it seems to be a no-brainer.”

Cresswell expects to have a rough cut of the movie in about 10 weeks, with a possible release date in the summer of 2016.

 

Now 19 years old, Craig wants to turn her passion for performing into a career and she’s hoping that her role as Odette in The Only Game in Town will help her achieve that goal.

“I’m really hoping this is what’s going to be my career for the rest of my life. Honestly, right now I’m living my dream.”

Craig is from Seafoam, and is one of several Pictou County actors who have major roles in the feature film that’s produced by Simple Films and being shot in Tatamagouche.

The comedy centres on Cormack Vertue, played by Jesse Hemmings of Merigomish. Cormack has Asperger’s Syndrome, is a whiz at the game Solitaire and is in love with Odette.

Hemmings is also hoping the film will jumpstart a career in acting. “I’m hoping it leads somewhere,” he said. “I really like being able to step out of myself and being something else.”

 

For Aldo Orsi and Josh Fifield, involvement in the film has allowed them to get a look at what happens behind the camera.

“For me I like to be able to see all the behind the scenes and it’s been really awesome to see what everyone does, asking questions. It’s really cool,” said Fifield.

He’s acted in high school stage productions several times, and notes the differences between the two mediums.

“With my previous theatre experience – you have to memorize the whole thing, so scene by scene is easier, and you get multiple takes.”

Orsi, who has had roles in plays at Northumberland Regional High School, said: “When you’re on stage, you can’t do it again.”

Continuity is also something new for them, but extremely important. Because the scenes weren’t shot in order, the actors are responsible for keeping track of their outfits day by day.

“We get to pick our outfits but we have to make sure the continuity is right. We have to remember what we wore on that day,” said Fifield.

He plans to study screen arts at NSCC in the fall, and said getting to be part of the film so close to home is great. “I plan on furthering my career in this and I feel it’s a great stepping stone. So far I love the experience.”

Filming for The Only Game in Town is expected to wrap up Thursday, after 14 days in Tatamagouche, with total filming time of about 20 days. This includes work at several other locations – River John, Scotsburn, Onslow, Malagash, and the Pictou County Wellness Centre back in May.

The feature film is being shot in a condensed time frame because of several factors, said Stuart Cresswell of Simple Films -- a film, TV and DVD production company with offices in River John.

“Due to the cost of hiring the equipment and accommodations – the longer it takes, the more expensive it is – it all adds up,” he said. “We saw a narrow window of opportunity to make the film.”

Another key consideration was the availability of the cast members, and the fact that they didn’t want to film on weekends during the school year. “You don’t get continuity on weekends,” he said.

Cresswell is the feature film’s scriptwriter, producer and director. He took on the role of director when Cory Bowles of Truro (Trailer Park Boys) wasn’t able to do the job because of scheduling conflicts that occurred after the project was delayed due to uncertainties surrounding the Nova Scotia Film Tax Credit.

Cresswell moved from England to River John in 2006, and chose to film in Tatamagouche because the area is both beautiful and welcoming.  

“The scenery up here is stunning,” he said, adding that the community is extremely supportive. “You face all sorts of challenges when making a film, and to have the community on your side, it seems to be a no-brainer.”

Cresswell expects to have a rough cut of the movie in about 10 weeks, with a possible release date in the summer of 2016.

 

Recent Stories