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Local gathering celebrates Queen’s reign


NEW GLASGOW – When Sandy Guadagni was a little girl, she had a book with a green silk cover called Princess Elizabeth.

The story was about the life led by the young member of the English royalty.

“As a kid she was kind of quiet and she didn’t have a lot of friends – she sounded like me,” said Guadagni. “Every time I felt lonely, I would read it.”

Guadagni grew up thinking the princess was her age, and she was disgruntled when she later learned that the princess who became the queen was old enough to be her own mother.

She traces her loyalty to the queen back to this connection, and the fact that her grandmother was an English immigrant.

Guadagni was one of about 60 people who attended a celebration on Wednesday at New Glasgow council chambers that marked Queen Elizabeth II becoming the longest-reigning sovereign of Canada.

She also supplied ladies attending the festivities with hats to wear from her collection of about 50 hats. She brought the hats to help make the occasion special and because she associates them with the monarch. “The Queen always wears a hat,” she said.

New Glasgow town councilor Trudi Vince wore one of the hats at the celebration, and said she loves the Queen. “I just think she’s wonderful. I admire her commitment and loyalty and sacrifice. She sacrificed her family life to serve.”

Mayor Barrie MacMillan said Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II personifies duty and personal sacrifice. “She has been a shining example of public service and she has reigned with fortitude, resolve and courage both as a young woman and as a veteran monarch. She is a mother, wife, grandmother, and a great-grandmother who has made her royal duty as Queen both her life's calling and passion.”

Doug Lloy is a member of the Northumberland branch of the Monarchist League of Canada, and believes the monarchy is important to Canada. “I think it’s a symbol of unity – it’s something that brings us all together. It’s vibrant and current today – not old and dusty,” he said.

“It’s continuity with the past and some assurance to the future.”

Nova Scotia Lt.-Gov. J.J. Grant attended the New Glasgow celebration, which featured a proclamation by town crier Jim Stewart, a re-affirmation of allegiance, a loyal toast and the singing of O Canada and the Royal Anthem by students from North Nova Education Centre.

Other celebrations were held in Stellarton, and by the Town of Pictou and the Municipality of Pictou County together.

 

SIDEBAR:

 

By the numbers

  • Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II has become the longest-reigning monarch of Canada and of England since the Norman Conquest, surpassing the reign of her great-great-grandmother Queen Victoria, who reigned for 63 years and 216 days.
  • Queen Elizabeth II has been the reigning monarch for 23,226 days.
  • Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor became the queen of England, and of Canada, when she was 25 years old, after her father King George VI passed away at the age of 56.
  • Queen Elizabeth II has visited Canada 22 times since becoming the country’s monarch in 1952.
  • The Commonwealth Realms over which she is the head of state number 16. The combined population of these nations is approximately 135 million.

 

SECOND SIDEBAR:

 

Mayor notes Queen’s 1959 visit

 

In his speech during Wednesday’s celebrations, Mayor Barrie MacMillan made reference to a visit Queen Elizabeth II made to New Glasgow, and photos of the royal visit were on display.

“On July 31, 1959, the Norfolk Hotel right here on Provost Street opened its doors to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Phillip, the Duke of Edinburgh, for the county’s second royal visit by a reigning sovereign. They were driven in an open car through the streets of New Glasgow as thousands of cheering citizens lined the route. A reception was held at the Norfolk where the mayor of the day, J.H. Power, officially welcomed them to New Glasgow. Several dignitaries were in attendance as the Queen and Prince were honoured by our town.”

The story was about the life led by the young member of the English royalty.

“As a kid she was kind of quiet and she didn’t have a lot of friends – she sounded like me,” said Guadagni. “Every time I felt lonely, I would read it.”

Guadagni grew up thinking the princess was her age, and she was disgruntled when she later learned that the princess who became the queen was old enough to be her own mother.

She traces her loyalty to the queen back to this connection, and the fact that her grandmother was an English immigrant.

Guadagni was one of about 60 people who attended a celebration on Wednesday at New Glasgow council chambers that marked Queen Elizabeth II becoming the longest-reigning sovereign of Canada.

She also supplied ladies attending the festivities with hats to wear from her collection of about 50 hats. She brought the hats to help make the occasion special and because she associates them with the monarch. “The Queen always wears a hat,” she said.

New Glasgow town councilor Trudi Vince wore one of the hats at the celebration, and said she loves the Queen. “I just think she’s wonderful. I admire her commitment and loyalty and sacrifice. She sacrificed her family life to serve.”

Mayor Barrie MacMillan said Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II personifies duty and personal sacrifice. “She has been a shining example of public service and she has reigned with fortitude, resolve and courage both as a young woman and as a veteran monarch. She is a mother, wife, grandmother, and a great-grandmother who has made her royal duty as Queen both her life's calling and passion.”

Doug Lloy is a member of the Northumberland branch of the Monarchist League of Canada, and believes the monarchy is important to Canada. “I think it’s a symbol of unity – it’s something that brings us all together. It’s vibrant and current today – not old and dusty,” he said.

“It’s continuity with the past and some assurance to the future.”

Nova Scotia Lt.-Gov. J.J. Grant attended the New Glasgow celebration, which featured a proclamation by town crier Jim Stewart, a re-affirmation of allegiance, a loyal toast and the singing of O Canada and the Royal Anthem by students from North Nova Education Centre.

Other celebrations were held in Stellarton, and by the Town of Pictou and the Municipality of Pictou County together.

 

SIDEBAR:

 

By the numbers

  • Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II has become the longest-reigning monarch of Canada and of England since the Norman Conquest, surpassing the reign of her great-great-grandmother Queen Victoria, who reigned for 63 years and 216 days.
  • Queen Elizabeth II has been the reigning monarch for 23,226 days.
  • Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor became the queen of England, and of Canada, when she was 25 years old, after her father King George VI passed away at the age of 56.
  • Queen Elizabeth II has visited Canada 22 times since becoming the country’s monarch in 1952.
  • The Commonwealth Realms over which she is the head of state number 16. The combined population of these nations is approximately 135 million.

 

SECOND SIDEBAR:

 

Mayor notes Queen’s 1959 visit

 

In his speech during Wednesday’s celebrations, Mayor Barrie MacMillan made reference to a visit Queen Elizabeth II made to New Glasgow, and photos of the royal visit were on display.

“On July 31, 1959, the Norfolk Hotel right here on Provost Street opened its doors to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Phillip, the Duke of Edinburgh, for the county’s second royal visit by a reigning sovereign. They were driven in an open car through the streets of New Glasgow as thousands of cheering citizens lined the route. A reception was held at the Norfolk where the mayor of the day, J.H. Power, officially welcomed them to New Glasgow. Several dignitaries were in attendance as the Queen and Prince were honoured by our town.”

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