Top News

Local word game app developers pitching Quick Wordz


MONCTON – Richard Wilson loves word games.

So much so, that he decided to create his own app, taking the best components of several other games and combining them for a unique new game called Quick Wordz.

“I’m a game designer and I'm into word games. I love playing them, as it is very challenging and a way to use my vocabulary to defeat friends and co-workers, but also learn a great deal of words.”

The objective of the game is to spell words and steal letters from your opponent. “We decided to take what’s out there and put a little spin on it.”

Wilson grew up in Riverton and also lived in New Glasgow for a time before relocating to Moncton, where he operates a business called Rikkir. He and his partners – Neeraj Mishra of India, Jorge Reyes of Columbia and Terry Megeney of Pictou County – added their own features to the game, such as the ability to capture and recapture an opponent’s tiles.

“It started by using the basic game concepts we loved and played growing up, like Scrabble, crosswords, and a more modern game called LetterPress,” said Wilson. “We wanted to take the games and make something completely new, and that’s what we’ve done.”

Another special feature is a “free roaming grid,” which allows players to put words in any direction, except diagonal, including up, down, left and right. Words can also be reversed and bent. “No game in the world does that now,” he said. “It’s the first time it’s been done – it’s very unique.”

It was also important to the team to create a game that involves multiple players.

“We have added everything needed to make a game that people will love and can play for free,” he said.

They decided to offer the game at no charge because they wanted it to be accessible to everyone, and they wanted to create a fan base. “It’s not about the money, because not everybody can pay. It’s just about getting it out there and having people love the game.

“We are not in the business of making money, as we have fun building something that everyone loves. This makes us happy and proud that our game overcame the ranks of many others and was chosen to be played on an ongoing basis by gamers.”

If people want an upgraded, customized version of the game, that can be purchased.

It took six months to develop the idea, and four versions to perfect it, he said. The app was sent to 25 people for testing, and he said 24 of the 25 loved the game. “They were amazed at how well it worked. They said we nailed it.”

Feedback from the testers was incorporated into the final version of the game.

Quick Wordz will be sent to Apple for release, which Wilson hopes will take place within the next two weeks, and the group has plans to release up to eight more games this year.

“We came together with an idea to make a popular game that was not hard on the wallet. We all added to that idea to make it the product it is today. Myself and Jorge have other apps on the market and have been very successful with them.”

Wilson has been a software engineer for three years, and was a programmer for 15 years. Five years ago, he developed an android app that uses a fingerprint to tell someone’s future, called MyPrints. “Mine was the first of its kind. It had 20,000 downloads in a month. People loved it.”

 

carol.dunn@ngnews.ca

On Twitter: NGNewsCarol

So much so, that he decided to create his own app, taking the best components of several other games and combining them for a unique new game called Quick Wordz.

“I’m a game designer and I'm into word games. I love playing them, as it is very challenging and a way to use my vocabulary to defeat friends and co-workers, but also learn a great deal of words.”

The objective of the game is to spell words and steal letters from your opponent. “We decided to take what’s out there and put a little spin on it.”

Wilson grew up in Riverton and also lived in New Glasgow for a time before relocating to Moncton, where he operates a business called Rikkir. He and his partners – Neeraj Mishra of India, Jorge Reyes of Columbia and Terry Megeney of Pictou County – added their own features to the game, such as the ability to capture and recapture an opponent’s tiles.

“It started by using the basic game concepts we loved and played growing up, like Scrabble, crosswords, and a more modern game called LetterPress,” said Wilson. “We wanted to take the games and make something completely new, and that’s what we’ve done.”

Another special feature is a “free roaming grid,” which allows players to put words in any direction, except diagonal, including up, down, left and right. Words can also be reversed and bent. “No game in the world does that now,” he said. “It’s the first time it’s been done – it’s very unique.”

It was also important to the team to create a game that involves multiple players.

“We have added everything needed to make a game that people will love and can play for free,” he said.

They decided to offer the game at no charge because they wanted it to be accessible to everyone, and they wanted to create a fan base. “It’s not about the money, because not everybody can pay. It’s just about getting it out there and having people love the game.

“We are not in the business of making money, as we have fun building something that everyone loves. This makes us happy and proud that our game overcame the ranks of many others and was chosen to be played on an ongoing basis by gamers.”

If people want an upgraded, customized version of the game, that can be purchased.

It took six months to develop the idea, and four versions to perfect it, he said. The app was sent to 25 people for testing, and he said 24 of the 25 loved the game. “They were amazed at how well it worked. They said we nailed it.”

Feedback from the testers was incorporated into the final version of the game.

Quick Wordz will be sent to Apple for release, which Wilson hopes will take place within the next two weeks, and the group has plans to release up to eight more games this year.

“We came together with an idea to make a popular game that was not hard on the wallet. We all added to that idea to make it the product it is today. Myself and Jorge have other apps on the market and have been very successful with them.”

Wilson has been a software engineer for three years, and was a programmer for 15 years. Five years ago, he developed an android app that uses a fingerprint to tell someone’s future, called MyPrints. “Mine was the first of its kind. It had 20,000 downloads in a month. People loved it.”

 

carol.dunn@ngnews.ca

On Twitter: NGNewsCarol

Recent Stories