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UPDATE: News of Canada Post changes surprising to local workers


NEW GLASGOW – The news that Canada Post will be phasing out urban delivery and raising the costs of stamps was surprising to many, including postal workers.  

Kevin Peterson, president of the local Canadian Union of Postal Workers, couldn’t make much of a statement about what it means locally because he’s not sure what the ramifications will be yet.

“We’re disappointed to receive the news in this way,” he said, explaining much of what he had found by early afternoon on Wednesday had come from a CBC story.

He said there was an idea something was coming, as supervisors in the area were at a meeting in Truro.

It was especially shocking for Peterson as the office in New Glasgow was advised just a few weeks ago during a mail volume count and “route restructuring” that they would be continuing with door-to-door delivery.

Canada Post announced a “five-point action plan” on Wednesday in efforts to be more financially sustainable.

Over the next five years, the remaining one-third of Canadian households that receive mail at their door will be moving to community mailbox delivery.

Many of those still receiving door delivery are in urban areas.

Locally, New Glasgow residents stand to be affected.

Canada Post expects to begin the move to community mailboxes in late 2014.

The remaining two-thirds of Canadians who receive their mail via community boxes, grouped or lobby boxes or curbside rural mailboxes won’t be affected. Many businesses will also continue to receive delivery.

Canada Post lists convenience and security as a few of the reasons behind the change, but cutting costs is also a focus.

They expect this initiative to save more money each year than any of the other announced changes due mostly to a reduction in the number of employees needed.

They’re expecting nearly 15,000 employees to retire or leave the company within the next five years.

The price of stamps will rise to $1 per stamp, and 85 cents each if purchased in booklets or coils, up from 63 cents each.

This move is one Peterson said he found odd with the decrease in letter mail.

“Why would you increase the price of stamps?” he asked, stating that he didn’t see how that would help in terms of the volume of mail sent.

The rate will stay at 63 cents until March 31.

Peterson said the move is concerning, and the union had been advocating other options.

They have suggested moving back into the financial sector, offering banking through the post office.

“It’s a way to generate revenue.”

Canada Post also plans to open more franchise postal outlets in stores and change technology for more efficiency.  

A Conference Board of Canada study in April projected Canada Post was looking at a loss of close to $1 billion by 2020.

 

Amanda.jess@ngnews.ca

On Twitter: @NGNewsAmanda 

Kevin Peterson, president of the local Canadian Union of Postal Workers, couldn’t make much of a statement about what it means locally because he’s not sure what the ramifications will be yet.

“We’re disappointed to receive the news in this way,” he said, explaining much of what he had found by early afternoon on Wednesday had come from a CBC story.

He said there was an idea something was coming, as supervisors in the area were at a meeting in Truro.

It was especially shocking for Peterson as the office in New Glasgow was advised just a few weeks ago during a mail volume count and “route restructuring” that they would be continuing with door-to-door delivery.

Canada Post announced a “five-point action plan” on Wednesday in efforts to be more financially sustainable.

Over the next five years, the remaining one-third of Canadian households that receive mail at their door will be moving to community mailbox delivery.

Many of those still receiving door delivery are in urban areas.

Locally, New Glasgow residents stand to be affected.

Canada Post expects to begin the move to community mailboxes in late 2014.

The remaining two-thirds of Canadians who receive their mail via community boxes, grouped or lobby boxes or curbside rural mailboxes won’t be affected. Many businesses will also continue to receive delivery.

Canada Post lists convenience and security as a few of the reasons behind the change, but cutting costs is also a focus.

They expect this initiative to save more money each year than any of the other announced changes due mostly to a reduction in the number of employees needed.

They’re expecting nearly 15,000 employees to retire or leave the company within the next five years.

The price of stamps will rise to $1 per stamp, and 85 cents each if purchased in booklets or coils, up from 63 cents each.

This move is one Peterson said he found odd with the decrease in letter mail.

“Why would you increase the price of stamps?” he asked, stating that he didn’t see how that would help in terms of the volume of mail sent.

The rate will stay at 63 cents until March 31.

Peterson said the move is concerning, and the union had been advocating other options.

They have suggested moving back into the financial sector, offering banking through the post office.

“It’s a way to generate revenue.”

Canada Post also plans to open more franchise postal outlets in stores and change technology for more efficiency.  

A Conference Board of Canada study in April projected Canada Post was looking at a loss of close to $1 billion by 2020.

 

Amanda.jess@ngnews.ca

On Twitter: @NGNewsAmanda 

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