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Museum of Industry offers free passes to 
families with loved ones in palliative care

The Museum of Industry is giving free passes to palliative care patients and their families to use. From left, Ann McKim, palliative care nurse; Dr. Anne Kwasnik, palliative care doctor; Debra McNabb, museum director; Margaret-Ellen Disney, chair of the Aberdeen Palliative Care Society and Ian Bos, Aberdeen Palliative Care Society board member.
The Museum of Industry is giving free passes to palliative care patients and their families to use. From left, Ann McKim, palliative care nurse; Dr. Anne Kwasnik, palliative care doctor; Debra McNabb, museum director; Margaret-Ellen Disney, chair of the Aberdeen Palliative Care Society and Ian Bos, Aberdeen Palliative Care Society board member. - Adam MacInnis

NEW GLASGOW, N.S.

Sometimes, people just need a break.

“I don’t think anybody realizes until they’re in the position of caring for someone who has a life-threatening illness how much of an emotional and physical strain it is,” says Margaret-Ellen Disney, chair of the Aberdeen Palliative Care Society. 

A new partnership between the Aberdeen Palliative Care Society and the Museum of Industry hopes to help alleviate the strain.

The Museum of Industry has stepped forward and offered to give the society free passes for the museum to be given to palliative care patients and their families who are receiving palliative care, either at the hospital or in their homes.

Museum director, Debra McNabb, said they felt it would be a good way to give back to a society that does so much for people in the community.

Ian Bos, who is on the board of directors for the Palliative Care Society, has been working with other groups to help provide activities that might be of interest to patients and caregivers who need either a little time away from their homes or the hospital.

“To see all these partnerships come together and people reaching out to help each other is what really inspires me," he said. 

With the added expenses of caring for a loved one, many people suffer economic hardships and just can’t afford to pay for activities themselves, which is another reason why Bos believes this is a great partnership.

“Sometimes you just need a distraction to just get out of the environment for a couple hours and kind of go back refreshed.”

Bos became actively involved in advocating for palliative care after the death of his own father. In appreciation for the care his dad received, Bos walked across Canada to raise funds and awareness for the Aberdeen Palliative Care Society.

While he wouldn’t take credit himself, he said it’s been nice to see in recent years more awareness about palliative care.

“People are coming to us now trying to help," he said. “I think that’s a positive sign of the education the society has been doing.”

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